PPI long-time employees recognized in annual confab

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On its 53rd founding anniversary last May, the Philippine Press Institute, also known as the national association of newspapers, recognized two employees of its secretariat for their length of service, commitment and exceptional performance. Edgar M. Abalajon began working in 1988 while Nemy S. Joquino started in 1989.  Both saw the growth of the institute after its revival in 1986.  Special plaques of appreciation were awarded to them by chairman-president Alfonso G. Pedroche at H2O Hotel in Manila.

For PPI partners, a celebration of kinship

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For partners of the Philippine Press Institute (PPI), the print media continues to play a major role in conveying information to the public that helps make their lives better and public engagement on key issues possible. This, amid the widespread use of social media that has threatened the viability of the traditional media, not least of which is print, and spawned hoax news and other forms of misleading information using digital technologies and today’s virtual platforms.

PPI elects new set of officers

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Marking its 53rd anniversary as the country’s premier association of newspapers, the Philippine Press Institute (PPI) elected a new board of trustees on Tuesday, at the opening of its two-day annual press forum in Manila.

ASEAN takes the spotlight in PPI’s 21st National Press Forum

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Now on its 53rd year as the country’s national association of newspapers, the Philippine Press Institute (PPI) is holding its 21st National Press Forum on May 24-26 in Manila.

Themed “ASEAN@50: Beyond the Headlines,” the event coincides with the regional organization’s golden anniversary.

Dureza calls on media to help advance peace

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Amid the raging tension in Marawi City, presidential peace advisor on the peace process Jesus G. Dureza highlighted the role of the media in helping calm down the situation and quell misinformation, which stokes terrorism fears and plays into terrorists’ agenda.

Probe issues, ditch superficial coverage of ASEAN — Myanmar journalist

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The media must strive to bring more substantive stories to their audiences on issues affecting the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and its member states.

Speaking Thursday at the 21st National Press Forum of the Philippine Press Institute (PPI), Saw Yan Nang, a senior reporter at The Irrawady, an independent media organization in Myanmar, said the media, in their coverage of the regional bloc, must go beyond regional meetings and similar events.

PPI’s keynote speaker highlights media’s role in promoting awareness of ASEAN

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Despite its perceived weaknesses and differences among its individual member states, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) share common values that have led to cooperation toward the achievement of certain collective aspirations.

Ambassador Rosario G. Manalo, who had represented the Philippines to ASEAN, spoke about the strengths, alongside the weaknesses and challenges still confronting the regional bloc, as keynote speaker in the just concluded 21st Annual Press Forum of the Philippine Press Institute (PPI), which also marks this year its 53rd anniversary.

ASEAN@50: Beyond the Headlines

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Today, at 50, ASEAN’s decades-long existence should prompt some earnest reflection on several fronts. How far has it gone in achieving its goals? How much of its multi-pronged vision for the 625 million-strong regional bloc is now undeniably a reality? Has it made a dent in the lives of its peoples, not just economically but also politically, socially, and culturally? To what extent is this being felt on the ground, if at all?

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